First Department Expands Discovery of Social Media Accounts

Just last year, the New York Court of Appeals ruled in the case of Forman v. Henkin, that a litigant’s public posts on Facebook were subject to discovery.  The decision was based on the premise that any limitation on the discovery of social media accounts would run counter to New York’s “tradition of liberal discovery.” On January 24, 2019, the First Department expanded on that premise.
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Facebook Posts Can Serve as Important Information in Head Injury Case

The New York State Court of Appeals recently ruled that information from an injury victim’s private Facebook account can be treated as information used in a legal action and, as such, the victim may have to offer that information to the opposing party in court. Continue reading “Facebook Posts Can Serve as Important Information in Head Injury Case”

Fraudulent Insurance Claims Revealed by Social Media

When defending against insurance claims in 2017, there are various forms of technology available to discover fraudulent claims. Through data analytics, internet-enabled automobiles, wearables and other forms of technology, insurance providers are able to discover when a claim is fraudulent. But what investigators are now starting to discover is that a claimant’s social media account could be the first place to start. Through a thorough investigation, a defendant can find valuable information to the defense of a claim. Recently, several claims have highlighted this fact.

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